LifyWheat

WHAT IS LIFYWHEAT ?

A UNIQUE AND PIONEERING INGREDIENT

To increase the consumption of fibres in different populations, Limagrain Ingredients is proud to introduce a unique and pioneering ingredient on the European market after 20 years of research: LifyWheat.

LifyWheat is part of this health approach, providing a practical response to the expectation of consumers looking for health, naturalness and transparency.

LifyWheat, like any other wheat, is a multipurpose ingredient. The flour can be used in a wide range of applications that fit into your / consumer’s daily life: bread, pasta, biscuits, breakfast cereals… It can be incorporated as a partial or total replacement for wheat flour or wheat grains without any major change in the process.

WHAT MAKES LIFYWHEAT DIFFERENT?

LifyWheat is a unique ingredient that achieves 4 objectives:

  • Eat “high-fibrely” every day.

LifyWheat white flour contains 10 times more fibres than common white wheat flour. With 25% fibres compared to 2.5% in a standard wheat.

  • Diversify with a smart fibre.

80% of the fibres in LifyWheat are resistant starch.

LifyWheat can easily enrich and diversify your fibre consumption. Its richness in resistant starch confers health benefits to the wheat.

  • Trust a native fibre.

Fibres are naturally present in the wheat grain; it is not extracted and processed

  • Improve your diet without changing your habits / Improve diets without changing consumer’s habits / No change in your habits, only in your body / Same habits/diet, better health / No compromise.

LifyWheat flour allows to improve diet without compromising on taste and texture. This flour increases fibres intake without changing eating habits compared to a traditional white flour. It offers the same taste and the same white colour as traditional flour with the ability to naturally enrich products with fibres.

Nutrition

Let food be thy medicine

(Hippocrates - 460-370 B.C.)
A balanced diet combined with regular physical activity plays an active role in our health.

WHAT IS A HEALTHY, BALANCED DIET?

It is a diet that meets the needs of our bodies through a balanced provision of essential nutrients (proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, vitamins, minerals and fibre).

No single food contains all the nutrients needed for our bodies to function properly. This is why we need to diversify our diet, favouring healthy food (fruit, vegetables, starches and fish) and limiting food with high levels of fat, sugar and salt.

WHAT EFFECT DOES DIET HAVE ON OUR INTESTINAL HEALTH?

Today, our approach to food is too often focused on pleasure and we tend to overlook its effect on our intestinal health.

An increasing number of scientific studies suggest a close relationship between diet, digestive health, intestinal flora and our physical, mental and social well-being.

Intestinal flora (also known as microbiota) consists of microorganisms that play a role in our body’s optimal assimilation of food.

It is key to:

  • optimising the energy of absorbed food,
  • the synthesis of essential vitamins,
  • providing the necessary energy to our intestinal cells,
  • strengthening our immune defences
  • and our well-being (synthesis of 90% of serotonin, known as the happy hormone)
Fibre

Fibre is non-digestible carbohydrate

It is naturally present in plants, especially cereals, fruit, vegetables and pulses.

THERE ARE TWO TYPES OF FIBRE:

  • Non-fermentable fibre (most of which is insoluble) that promotes healthy intestinal transit. Its name derives from the fact that it is not broken down by our intestines, but instead stimulates the passage of food.
    It is mainly found in the husks of plants and cereals, with the most widely-known being cellulose, lignin and hemicellulose.
  • Fermentable fibre (soluble or insoluble) derives its name from the fact it is broken down by our intestines and provides the main fuel for our microbiota.
    It is especially found in starches, dried vegetables, certain cereals, fruit and vegetables. The best known are pectin, gums and resistant starch.

WHY DO WE NEED TO EAT FIBRE?

Fibre is essential to the health of our digestive system.

Non-fermentable fibre plays a mechanical role by stimulating and regulating intestinal transit. It therefore helps clean our colon by clearing it of undigested matter, dead bacteria and toxins.

Fermentable fibre plays a functional and nutritional role, prolonging the effect of satiety and limiting the absorption of glucose in the blood. Once in the colon, it is broken down by the healthy bacteria in our microbiota to incite the production of butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid that provides energy for our intestinal cells.

It thus helps prevent certain diseases, such as diabetes and cancer.

Unfortunately, we currently consume less than 20 g of fibre per day, even though the World Health Organisation recommends a daily intake of 25 to 30 g.

It is therefore important to readjust our intake of fibre, particularly fermentable fibre, for example by increasing the amount of resistant starch or soluble fibre in our diet.

Resistant starch

Resistant starch is an undigested starch

WHAT IS STARCH?

Starch is naturally present in starchy foods (potatoes, cereals and pulses) and is a complex carbohydrate, solely consisting of glucose chains. During digestion, starch is completely transformed into simple carbohydrate (glucose), before being carried in the blood to provide energy for our body.

There is a specific type of starch, called resistant starch. This is not broken down into glucose during digestion and ends up in the colon where it is consumed by microbiota (the bacteria of our intestinal flora).

This undigested starch is considered to be a fermentable fibre that is useful for developing healthy microbiota and actively contributes to our intestinal health.

WHAT IS THE ROLE OF RESISTANT STARCH IN OUR DIET?

For many years, resistant starch formed an important part of our diet.

Yet when our diet changed during the 20th century, it became richer in animal proteins and fats, leading to a significant reduction in the proportion of fibre, particularly resistant starch.

This unbalanced diet is a recognised risk factor in a number of societal diseases, including type II diabetes, colon cancer and irritable bowel syndrome.

To help prevent these diseases, we therefore need to readjust our diets, increasing the quantity of fibre – in particular resistant starch – that we eat every day.

WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF RESISTANT STARCH?

Resistant starch is a natural blood sugar regulator.

It is non-digestible, which means it is not turned into glucose during digestion. Preferring resistant starch to starch in our diet therefore helps to attenuate the increase in blood sugar levels. High blood sugar levels are particularly harmful in the short and long term, potentially leading to type II diabetes, which is characterised by disruption to blood glucose regulation.

This dietary fibre also has significant beneficial effects on intestinal microbiota:

  • Resistant starch is a source of energy for microbiota, playing an active role in the health of our intestinal flora. This is called the prebiotic effect.
  • Thanks to resistant starch, the microbiota generates butyrate, the key nutrient for our colon cells. It plays a protective role and ensures the proper functioning of intestinal mucous.

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LIMAGRAIN INGREDIENTS
30 avenue George Gershwin
63200 RIOM
Téléphone : +33 (0) 4 73 67 17 00
Fax : +33 (0) 4 73 67 17 10
www.limagrain-ingredients.com



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